100+ Fun Creative Writing Prompts for Kids (and Kids-at-Heart!)

The article 100+ Fun Creative Writing Prompts for Kids (and Kids-at-Heart!) appeared first on The Write Practice.

One of the best ways you can foster a love of reading and writing in children is to offer lots of low-stakes opportunities to practice. These kids writing prompts can be used with any group of kids you’re working with: elementary school, middle school, or high school writers.

kids writing prompts

Prompts can help kids break through creative writing idea blocks or boredom. Whether in a slump or starting a new project, try a prompt a day and see what happens.

Keep it as simple as possible: one notebook or document, one location, the same(-ish) time each day, and a timer set for 5, 10, or 15 minutes.

Don’t let yourself edit, reread, or rework anything. Just write. Keep the pen moving across the page. There’s no wrong way to play.

Plus, there’s a great note for you, whether you’re a parent or teacher or both, at the end.

Give these fun creative writing prompts a try and watch how consistent practice contributes to ideas, confidence, and yes, even stronger writing skills!

20 Journal Writing Prompts

Journal prompts are fun writing prompts that are great for recording your everyday life. It’s like taking a snapshot. It’s fun to look back in a month, a season, or a year to see how you’ve grown or changed.

One additional thought that is important to keep in mind when writing a journal writing prompt is that it encourages kids to explore answers beyond one word or sentence. The best way to get them to write more is to ask why they answered a prompt the way they did.

Asking the question why not only encourages children to consider their beliefs, wants, and values, but also pushes them to really explore their voice through creative writing ideas.

Recommended time for each: 5-7 minutes

1. What is your earliest memory? Describe this memory.

2. What is the best part of your week and why?

3. What is your favorite thing to do after school? Why?

4. What is (or was) your favorite toy? Why?

5. Describe your favorite animal or pet. Why is this your favorite? (Fun variation: Describe your favorite pet or animal’s perspective of you.)

6. Describe your typical morning as if you are your bathroom mirror or a door in your home.

7. What is your favorite food? If you could choose anything, what would you pick to eat for breakfast? For lunch? For dinner?

8. Describe your last birthday party or celebration. Why is this your favorite?

9. Describe your favorite game or video game as if you are a character in the game. Walk us through it.

10. Who is your favorite person? Describe how you spend your favorite holiday with them.

11. What is your favorite character from a TV show or book and why?

12. If your life was a fairy tale, which one would it most resemble and why?

13. What is your favorite movie and why? Favorite TV show?

14. What was your favorite book to read when you were younger? What is your favorite book now? Why do you love it?

15. What is something grown-ups or family members ask you about? How does it make you feel?

16. What is one thing you are grateful for this week? Why?

17. What would your dream job be? Why?

18. What do you know a lot about that you could talk (or write) about for days?

19. What is your favorite season and why?

20. What is your favorite sport or hobby and why?

Bonus journal prompts!

21. What kind of ice cream or dessert do you love best? Why?

22. What do you hope to accomplish before you grow into an older kid or adult?

23. If you got to spend a whole day with one famous person, who would it be and what would you do?

A great way to encourage kids to read and write is with a fun writing exercise. Practice writing with this list of 100+ fun writing prompts for kids.
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20 Letter Writing Prompts

Letter writing may feel like a lost art, but it’s a terrific way to help kids practice writing skills because it requires an audience and purpose. Letters can be written to send to real family members or best friends. And every person has a different writing style when they write a letter, which makes them unique!

Letters can also be creatively designed to be a part of a story. Or they can just be practice for writing with a fun writing prompt.

Whether or not you use letter writing prompts for students or as a meaningful exercise to strengthen writing skills with your kids at home, or as a method for creative writing practice in school, letters themselves are a timeless art and method of connecting with others.

Letters can also inspire writers to take up a diary. Who knows, maybe they’ll even want to use some of these writing prompts for their next diary entry, just for continued practice.

Give these creative writing prompts a try!

Recommended time for each: 10+ minutes

24. Write a letter to the most used piece of furniture in your home.

25. Write a letter to a best friend or good friend about a wild adventure you’d like to take together.

26. Write a letter to your favorite movie star.

27. Write a letter to your favorite wild animal (or your least favorite!) in a zoo or aquarium.

28. Write a letter to a family member about something you learned on your first day of school.

29. Write a letter to your favorite TV show character about what they should do in a future episode.

30. Write a letter to an alien explaining how you do an everyday task like eating or playing.

31. Imagine you can send mail through a time machine. Write a letter to your past or future self.

32. Write a letter to the inventor of your favorite food, toy, or game. Tell them what you love about it.

33. Write a letter to a historical figure you admire.

34. Write a letter to your favorite athlete or musician explaining why you love to see them perform.

35. Write a letter to an inventor of a household object with ideas for its improvement.

36. Write a letter to a parent, teacher, or other grown up to thank them.

37. Write a letter to a person, school, or organization about something that needs to be changed.

38. Write a letter to your favorite childhood cartoon.

39. Write a letter to your favorite author.

40. Write a letter to a pet you wish you had. (This could be a wild animal or a magical creature!)

41. Write a letter to a grandparent, aunt, uncle or other grownup about the best thing they cook or bake for you.

42. Write a letter to a sibling or friend full of as many jokes as you can think of.

43. Write a letter to the sidewalk explaining why everyone walks on them.

Bonus letter writing prompts: postcards!

Postcards require you to condense your message into as few words as possible. Try these!

44. Write about a winter or summer vacation memory.

45. Tell a friend about your last school year.

20 Story Writing Prompts

If you have a little more time, you can try these prompts to write a short story. Sometimes the hardest part about writing a story is coming up with a story idea that can get you or your students and kids started.

This article is here to help everyone get over that slump. It doesn’t have to be the funniest story or best story in the world to be a great story. Every writer only gets better with practice.

Don’t feel like you have to take any of these upcoming story ideas too seriously. Writing a short story is not a life or death situation. It is something that you can use  to explore yourself, your beliefs, and big, unanswered questions—all of which you get to explore through the eyes of a fictional character you create!

Most stories feature a main character who wants something, but conflict gets in the way. And the conflict forces them to make a crucial decision.

How will your hero pursue their goal? Figure this out by writing out your story idea!

Recommended time for each: 15+ minutes

46. Write a new ending or a next chapter for your favorite or a well-known fairy tale.

47. You get a call from your best friend that their favorite item is missing. Write a story where you work together to find it.

48. Imagine your bus or car suddenly turns into a spaceship with a course charted for outer space. What happens next?

49. A classmate or sibling calls for help and disappears before you can react. H

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