5 Tips To Help You Write Excellent Introductions

Photo by Arno Smit on Unsplash

The introduction is the facade of a text. It needs to be exciting and give the reader an idea of what they get inside. Imagine walking past a new coffee shop. You see a coffee-cup-shaped sign and a warm, welcoming door. If you wanted coffee, you’d be tempted to go in.

Your introduction needs to let your target audience identify themselves and get them excited to read your text.

If you’re a writer, practice yor introductions. Keep editing until they’re great. Use this article as a guideline for what your introductions should achieve. Master these five tips, and you’ll not only make your audience read on; they’ll feel satisfied when they do.

Create a great hook

A hook is a small piece of writing designed to grab attention and make the reader excited. A good, thought-provoking question, a few interesting details, or a beautiful description can all do the trick. Keep it short and get to the point. The introduction is one place where you can’t afford to waste any words.

While hooking the reader is not the only goal, it might be the most important one. If you don’t get the reader excited within a paragraph or two, they’ll probably find something else to read. There’s too much to read these days to waste time on what doesn’t excite you.

One of the best ways to hook the reader is to answer the question, “why should I read this?” Show or tell the reader what they’ll gain from reading your text. Who is it aimed at, and what can they expect to learn or experience?

Set the tone

Your introduction should set the tone for the rest of the text. Is your writing casual and informative, or is it humorous and speculative? Maybe it’s more formal and supported by research? The introduction should show the reader what kind of text they’re reading.

It’s a good idea to edit the introduction with tone in mind and make sure it fits with the rest of the text. Think of it as a painting. The colors have to harmonize and work together, or it will be a jarring sight.

Specify what and why

Your introduction should tell the reader the topic of your text and how they can benefit from reading it. If I get through the introduction and still don’t know what I’m reading about, I’ll stop reading. If the introduction convinces me that this text will benefit me, I’m in. Tell the reader what they’re reading and why they need to read it.

Think of the introduction as a promise

Your introduction is a promise to the reader of what they will get out of the text. You don’t need to write, “I promise that you will learn the secrets of cheese making.” But, as you introduce the topic, point, and tone of your text, you promise the reader certain things.

If your introduction is funny and light, that’s a promise that the rest of the text will be as well. If you introduce a question in your introduction, your reader will expect the answer at some point. Don’t make promises you won’t keep. Make sure the text delivers on everything you promise. If you don’t, you set the reader up for disappointment.

Guide the reader to the main part

Apart from giving the reader information, the point of the introduction is to get them into the text. Try to create a natural transition that also invokes curiosity or excitement about what follows.

It can help to think of the introduction as a door. It should be accessible, attractive, and easy to open. Don’t make the reader struggle to get in. Most times, they won’t bother.

Consider what the reader needs to know before getting into the text. Do they need to understand why you’ve chosen to write this? Probably not. Give them the information they need, appeal to their emotions, and give them a reason to read on. Anything that doesn’t do this doesn’t need to be in the introduction.

Introductions are like doors; if you don’t include them, your reader will feel like they’ve walked into a wall. They can be beautiful and functional, and both doors and introductions should give you an idea of what to expect inside. Craft your introductions with care and invite the reader to read the rest of your text.


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Photo by Arno Smit on Unsplash

The introduction is the facade of a text. It needs to be exciting and give the reader an idea of what they get inside. Imagine walking past a new coffee shop. You see a coffee-cup-shaped sign and a warm, welcoming door. If you wanted coffee, you’d be tempted to go in.

Your introduction needs to let your target audience identify themselves and get them excited to read your text.

If you’re a writer, practice yor introductions. Keep editing until they’re great. Use this article as a guideline for what your introductions should achieve. Master these five tips, and you’ll not only make your audience read on; they’ll feel satisfied when they do.

Create a great hook

A hook is a small piece of writing designed to grab attention and make the reader excited. A good, thought-provoking question, a few interesting details, or a beautiful description can all do the trick. Keep it short and get to the point. The introduction is one place where you can’t afford to waste any words.

While hooking the reader is not the only goal, it might be the most important one. If you don’t get the reader excited within a paragraph or two, they’ll probably find something else to read. There’s too much to read these days to waste time on what doesn’t excite you.

One of the best ways to hook the reader is to answer the question, “why should I read this?” Show or tell the reader what they’ll gain from reading your text. Who is it aimed at, and what can they expect to learn or experience?

Set the tone

Your introduction should set the tone for the rest of the text. Is your writing casual and informative, or is it humorous and speculative? Maybe it’s more formal and supported by research? The introduction should show the reader what kind of text they’re reading.

It’s a good idea to edit the introduction with tone in mind and make sure it fits with the rest of the text. Think of it as a painting. The colors have to harmonize and work together, or it will be a jarring sight.

Specify what and why

Your introduction should tell the reader the topic of your text and how they can benefit from reading it. If I get through the introduction and still don’t know what I’m reading about, I’ll stop reading. If the introduction convinces me that this text will benefit me, I’m in. Tell the reader what they’re reading and why they need to read it.

Think of the introduction as a promise

Your introduction is a promise to the reader of what they will get out of the text. You don’t need to write, “I promise that you will learn the secrets of cheese making.” But, as you introduce the topic, point, and tone of your text, you promise the reader certain things.

If your introduction is funny and light, that’s a promise that the rest of the text will be as well. If you introduce a question in your introduction, your reader will expect the answer at some point. Don’t make promises you won’t keep. Make sure the text delivers on everything you promise. If you don’t, you set the reader up for disappointment.

Guide the reader to the main part

Apart from giving the reader information, the point of the introduction is to get them into the text. Try to create a natural transition that also invokes curiosity or excitement about what follows.

It can help to think of the introduction as a door. It should be accessible, attractive, and easy to open. Don’t make the reader struggle to get in. Most times, they won’t bother.

Consider what the reader needs to know before getting into the text. Do they need to understand why you’ve chosen to write this? Probably not. Give them the information they need, appeal to their emotions, and give them a reason to read on. Anything that doesn’t do this doesn’t need to be in the introduction.

Introductions are like doors; if you don’t include them, your reader will feel like they’ve walked into a wall. They can be beautiful and functional, and both doors and introductions should give you an idea of what to expect inside. Craft your introductions with care and invite the reader to read the rest of your text.

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