7 Resources For Crafting Successful Pitches

7 Resources For Crafting Successful PitchesPhoto by Andrea Piacquadio on Pexels

Pitching publications and improving writing skills can feel daunting and exciting at the same time. We may not be sure how to do it best or which publications to choose. We may not know what makes a successful pitch or if a publication will pay the amount we need. Having success in these areas definitely takes time, practice, and support from others — but it’s worth it. In order to make the support aspect more easily accessible to you, I compiled seven resources that can help you pitch successfully, make more money, and write stronger headlines.

1. Tim Herrera’s interview about getting on an editor’s go-to list

Tim errera is an editor for The New York Times who wants to help other freelance writers. He interviewed freelancer Anna Goldfarb, a writer he’s turned to multiple times for stories about relationships and careers. In his newsletter, which you can access on his Substack website, he included the written version of the interview in which Goldfarb shares how she presented herself as an editor’s go-to writer. This interview also covers information about rates she charges, how she comes up with ideas, and more helpful advice worth reading.

2. Journo Resources’s list of different publications’ pitching guidelines

If you’re new to freelancing or looking for a new publication to publish with, you may want a list of your options and the guidelines to help ensure the publication accepts your pitch. Journo Resources put together an extensive list of publications, hyperlinking the guidelines for each. By also adding the topics these publications cover, this resource helps you pick the ones that interest you quickly.

3. The Open Notebook’s pitch database

Pitching is difficult when you feel like you’re in the dark about what exactly the publication is currently looking to commission. Publications can also have different guidelines, so knowing what to add to your pitch can seem unclear. However, The Open Notebook compiled a database of pitches that can help. You can view other people’s successful pitches and filter them by topic, year, and more. Additionally, you can add your own successful pitches to support other writers.

4. CoSchedule’s list of powerful words for emotional headlines

CoSchedule, an organization supporting marketers, posted a slide listing over 180 powerful, emotional words. By adding these words to your headline, you can strengthen it and potentially increase your readership. Since headline strength can determine whether someone reads your piece, this is a valuable resource, especially for writers who need to add an extra punch.

5. Britni de la Cretaz’s writing resources

Britni de la Cretaz is a writer. On her website, she explains how to pitch, where to pitch, and how you can find writing jobs. Further, she describes how you can use Twitter to find contact information for editors, and she shares helpful websites. She’s honest and includes plenty of information. If you’re looking to pitch a publication, this resource is for you.

6. The Successful Pitches website

For more examples of successful pitches, check out the website with that name. You can search through the database, add your own pitch that worked, and see their other freelance resources. Besides listing the publication, this database also lists the type of article, the article’s word count, and more information to make the information clearer.

7. Journo Resources’s freelance rates list

Publications aren’t always the most transparent about the rates they offer, or the information can be hard to find. If you’d like to learn more about general rates and rates for several publications, check out the long list put together by Journo Resources. In addition to the rate and name of the publication, the table also shows the year this rate was recorded and the type of article it was, since that can affect the amount of money offered.

Takeaways

I’m quick to validate that while I love it, freelance writing can be a tough business. If you’re looking for transparency around rates or successful pitches, these resources can help. In addition, they can help you craft pitches that contain strong headlines and benefit your work with a publication long-term. I encourage you to work hard, check out other resources, and sign up for my monthly writer newsletter!


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7 Resources For Crafting Successful PitchesPhoto by Andrea Piacquadio on Pexels

Pitching publications and improving writing skills can feel daunting and exciting at the same time. We may not be sure how to do it best or which publications to choose. We may not know what makes a successful pitch or if a publication will pay the amount we need. Having success in these areas definitely takes time, practice, and support from others — but it’s worth it. In order to make the support aspect more easily accessible to you, I compiled seven resources that can help you pitch successfully, make more money, and write stronger headlines.

1. Tim Herrera’s interview about getting on an editor’s go-to list

Tim errera is an editor for The New York Times who wants to help other freelance writers. He interviewed freelancer Anna Goldfarb, a writer he’s turned to multiple times for stories about relationships and careers. In his newsletter, which you can access on his Substack website, he included the written version of the interview in which Goldfarb shares how she presented herself as an editor’s go-to writer. This interview also covers information about rates she charges, how she comes up with ideas, and more helpful advice worth reading.

2. Journo Resources’s list of different publications’ pitching guidelines

If you’re new to freelancing or looking for a new publication to publish with, you may want a list of your options and the guidelines to help ensure the publication accepts your pitch. Journo Resources put together an extensive list of publications, hyperlinking the guidelines for each. By also adding the topics these publications cover, this resource helps you pick the ones that interest you quickly.

3. The Open Notebook’s pitch database

Pitching is difficult when you feel like you’re in the dark about what exactly the publication is currently looking to commission. Publications can also have different guidelines, so knowing what to add to your pitch can seem unclear. However, The Open Notebook compiled a database of pitches that can help. You can view other people’s successful pitches and filter them by topic, year, and more. Additionally, you can add your own successful pitches to support other writers.

4. CoSchedule’s list of powerful words for emotional headlines

CoSchedule, an organization supporting marketers, posted a slide listing over 180 powerful, emotional words. By adding these words to your headline, you can strengthen it and potentially increase your readership. Since headline strength can determine whether someone reads your piece, this is a valuable resource, especially for writers who need to add an extra punch.

5. Britni de la Cretaz’s writing resources

Britni de la Cretaz is a writer. On her website, she explains how to pitch, where to pitch, and how you can find writing jobs. Further, she describes how you can use Twitter to find contact information for editors, and she shares helpful websites. She’s honest and includes plenty of information. If you’re looking to pitch a publication, this resource is for you.

6. The Successful Pitches website

For more examples of successful pitches, check out Go to Source