Halo Infinite PC performance guide: The best settings for a high frame rate

Halo Infinite‘s multiplayer is here, three weeks ahead of time. In a surprise announcement during Xbox’s 20th anniversary celebration, Microsoft dropped the Halo Infinite multiplayer beta. To get you set up before the game officially launches, we put together a guide on the best settings for Halo Infinite so you can optimize your PC’s performance.

The Halo: Master Chief Collection is on PC, but Halo Infinite is the first new game in the franchise to arrive on PC since the original Halo: Combat Evolved. There are a lot of graphics options to dig into, as well as a few critical options you need to tweak for a high frame rate.

The best settings for Halo Infinite

Halo Infinite includes a sizable list of graphical options, with 19 settings to tweak — ignoring the dynamic resolution and sensory effect options, as well as the tiny UI elements. There isn’t a single setting that represents a big gain in performance, unlike Forza Horizon 5, where we saw a 14% increase in our average frame rate with a single setting change.

Halo Infinite makes you work a little harder. Although none of the settings bring big wins, you can still squeeze some extra performance out of the graphics options. Here are the best settings for Halo Infinite:

  • Anti-aliasing: High
  • Texture filtering: High
  • Ambient occlusion: Medium
  • Texture quality: Medium
  • Geometry detail: Medium
  • Reflections: Low
  • Depth of field: High
  • Shadow quality: Low
  • Lighting quality: High
  • Volumetric fog: Medium
  • Cloud quality: High
  • Dynamic wind: Medium
  • Ground cover quality: High
  • Effects quality: Medium
  • Decal quality: High
  • Animation quality: Auto
  • Terrain quality: Medium
  • Simulation quality: High
  • Flocking: Off
  • Sensory effects: Default

The important settings are the top 10. We saw the biggest increase with reflections. Turning the setting down to Low, we increased our average frame rate by nearly 11%, and in the heated action of Halo Infinite, the drop in visual quality is hard to make out. You can turn reflections off entirely, but that’s a visual change you’ll notice. We didn’t see any performance between Low and Off, either.

Shadow quality also brought a solid 7% increase in our average frame rate, and volumetric fog brought back 4%. Overall, texture resolution, reflections, shadows, and volumetric fog are the most important settings to look at. Depending on your CPU, there are a few other settings to take note of.

Simulation quality and and animation quality both rely on your CPU. For animation quality, we recommended leaving it set at Auto. There isn’t a lower setting, and this mode will adjust the animation quality based on your CPU’s power. For simulation quality, we recommend turning it down to Medium if you have a six- core eight-core CPU or if your CPU is a couple of generations old. If you have one of the best gaming processors, you shouldn’t need to worry about these options.

Although the top 10 settings are the most important, you shouldn’t ignore the rest of the list. The problem is that the settings further down the list are situational, so they only bring a performance improvement in maps where they’re relevant — more on that later.

We turned flocking off, because looking at an accurate flock of birds doesn’t really change the gameplay experience. Similarly, we left dynamic wind at Medium and cloud quality at High, because neither of these settings were relevant in the main map we tested (Streets). In large, outdoor maps such as Deadlock, these settings are more important.

At the bottom of the list, we have the sensory effects. Halo Infinite includes a list of sliders for motion blur, screen white-out, and a few other UI effects. Based on our testing, these settings don’t change anything in terms of performance. Tweak them how you want, but don’t look at to the sensory effects for any extra performance.

Halo Infinite system requirements

Halo Infinite is designed to run on everything from the base Xbox One to high-end gaming PCs, but you wouldn’t know that from the system requirements. You’ll need either a recent AMD Ryzen processor or quad-core Intel chip to run the game, along with one of the best graphics card from the past few AMD and Nvidia generations.

Here are the minimum and recommended system requirements for Halo Infinite:

Minimum Recommended
CPU AMD Ryzen 5 1600 or Intel i5-4440 AMD Ryzen 7 3700X or Intel i7-9700K
GPU AMD RX 570 or Nvidia GTX 1050 Ti Radeon RX 5700 XT or Nvidia RTX 2070
Memory 8GB 16GB
OS Windows 10 RS5 x64 Windows 10 19H2 x64
DirectX DirectX 12 DirectX 12
Storage 50GB 50GB

Halo Infinite is fairly demanding, with only high-end gaming PCs from the last few years meeting the recommended system requirements. Based on our testing, the game isn’t nearly as scalable as a title like Back 4 Blood. On PC, at least, you’ll need some powerful hardware to run it.

There are a few interesting notes from the system requirements, though. First, storage. The requirements list the game as taking up 50GB of space, but the base game only takes up 19GB, and the high resolution texture pack requires an additional 8GB. We suspect the 50GB requirement is for when the campaign launches, which will surely bloat the installation size.

The high resolution texture pack is an interesting point of contention. It’s installed and enabled by default, but you can disable it in both the Steam and Xbox app versions. Player reports suggest that this pack will tank your performance. We’ll dig a bit more into if it does later, but keep in mind that disabling the texture pack is an option.

Halo Infinite PC performance and upscaling, tested

As with all of our PC performance guides, we took Halo Infinite out for a spin with three graphics cards targeting three resolutions: The RTX 3070 for 4K, the RTX 2060 Super for 1440p, and the RX 580 for 1080p. The last two cards, in particular, closely align with the system requirements, so we expected solid performance out of them.

Unfortunately, that’s not what we saw. Before getting to the results, we should point out that we ran out tests with a Ryzen 9 5950X CPU and 32GB of RAM. The CPU plays a role in Halo Infinite, but we wanted to remove it from the equation as much as possible to focus on GPU performance.

RTX 3070 RTX 2060 Super RX 580
1080p Ultra 119 fps 90 fps 31 fps
1080p Recommended 165 fps 104 fps 38 fps
1440p Ultra 92 fps 65 fps 26 fps
1440p Recommended 126 fps 77 fps 31 fps
4K Ultra 55 fps 36 fps 16 fps
4K Recommended 72 fps 46 fps 20 fps

The RX 580 is a good place to start because we just couldn’t crack the 60 frames per second (fps) mark with it. This card is faster than the RX 570 the developer recommends, but even at the lowest quality preset at 1080p, we averaged a measly 40 fps. Using the dynamic resolution option helped a bit, increasing the frame rate to 45 fps at 1080p.

Otherwise, we saw much better performance. The RTX 2060 Super broke 60 fps at 1440p with all of the sliders turned up, but our optimized settings still brought an 18% increase in our average frame rate. At 4K, the RTX 3070 struggled to hit 60 fps at max settings, but our optimized list still produced a comfortable 72 fps average.

For all of these tests, we kept upscaling turned off. Halo Infinite offers minimum and maxi

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