Spelling Tips: Cozy or Cosy? | Proofed’s Writing Tips

Spelling Tips: Cozy or Cosy?

“Cozy” and “cosy” are two spellings of the same adjective, which is used to describe something that gives a feeling of warmth and comfort. But does it matter whether you write about a “cozy log cabin” or a “cosy log cabin”?

In this post, we explain the difference between these two spellings.

American English vs. British English

“Cozy” is the preferred spelling in American English, while “cosy” is used in British English. Which spelling to use, therefore, depends on which dialect you are using:

American English: The cat slept in its cozy basket.

British English: The cat slept in its cosy basket.

You can also use “cozy” or “cosy” as a noun. In this case, it refers to a soft covering used to keep something warm (usually a teapot or a boiled egg):

American English: You should use a cozy if you want your tea to stay hot.

British English: You should use a cosy if you want your tea to stay hot.

Australian English usually follows the conventions of British English, and therefore “cosy” is correct if you are writing for an Australian audience.

Derivatives of Cozy and Cosy

The spellings above extend to any words derived from “cozy” and “cosy”:

This is much cozier / cosier than the last hotel I stayed in.

It was the coziest / cosiest blanket I’d ever had.

If you boil six eggs, you’ll need six egg cozies / cosies.

As such, you should use a “z” in these words if you’re using American English, and you should use an “s” if you are using British (or Australian) English.

Summary: Cozy or Cosy?

The spelling of this word depends on the dialect you are using:

  • Cozy is correct in American English.
  • Cosy is correct in British and Australian English.

We hope this post has clarified which spelling to use in your writing. If you’d like an expert to check for other mistakes in your documents, our proofreaders are available around the clock. Why not send us 500 words to proofread for free?

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